UCSB Campus Lagoon


GENERAL

Source
SiteUniversity of California, Santa Barbara, Campus Lagoon

MapGoleta, USGS 7.5' quadrangle

LocationThe Campus Lagoon is located on the Main Campus of UCSB near Goleta Point. The community of Isla Vista is immediately to the west and Goleta Slough and the Santa Barbara Municipal Airport are to the northeast.

ContactsUCSB Museum of Systematic and Ecology: 805-893-2506


UCSB Office of Budget and Planning: 805-893-3971

Approximate Wetland Habitat Acreage 37+
3
Approximate Historic Acreage Area of open water is approximately the same as in the 1871/73 maps but the area of fringe wetland and intertidal areas were larger (acreage not specified).
2
OwnershipOwner
Acres
Source

University of California, Santa Barbara (part of the 405 ac. Main Campus) 37+
1
LAND USE

Source
Land Use Designation The UCSB 1990 Long Range Development Plan (LRDP) as amended designates the Campus Lagoon area as an 'Environmentally Sensitive Habitat Area' (ESHA) and Open Space.
3
Onsite UseThe Campus Lagoon Managment Plan states that the ESHA area is designated to protect, enhance, and restore the lagoon, and provide opportunities for research and instruction. The Open Space area provides a buffer from the developed campus areas and an area for passive recreation.
3
Historic UseArchaeological evidence indicates that this general area has been occupied by humans for up to 9000 years. Agriculture and cattle ranching were introduced in the 1780's, and by the 1900's agriculture had extended on to 'Lagoon Island', a peninsula within the lagoon. In the 1890's asphaltum was mined from a site at the northwestern corner of the lagoon wetlands.
2, 3
Adjacent UseThe Campus Lagoon is surrounded on the north, east and west by the Main Campus of UCSB and is bordered on the south by the Pacific Ocean.
1
Adjacent Historic Use By the 1920's the entire surrounding mesa was used for agriculture and ranching, and residential development had begun in Isla Vista. During the early 1940's a Marine Corps training base was constructed at the current site of the UCSB Main Campus. The UC Regents acquired title to the Marine Corps base in 1948.
1
HYDROLOGY

Source
Tidal Influence None. A permanent beach berm at the western arm of the lagoon and a revetment at the easterly arm prevent tidal inflow. During winter storms and accompanying high tides the beach berm and the revetment may be overtopped by ocean water. Historically the lagoon was reported to be occasionally open to tidal action.
3
Watershed Area 168 acres of the Main Campus.
3
Tributaries and Flow Tributary
Flow
Source

None
1
DamsNone
1
Other Sources The lagoon receives water from three main sources; 1) general storm water surface run-off, 2) outfall from eight storm drains from the Main Campus, and 3) 400-500 gpm of seawater discharged from the Marine Biotechnology Laboratory.
2
WATER QUALITY

Source
GeneralThe RWQCB lists the Beneficial Uses of the water at the lagoon as; rec1, rec2, wild, warm, spwn, biol, rare, and comm. The lagoon is not included on the 303(d) List. The accumulation of nutrients from runoff are reported to result in algal blooms and eutrophic conditions.
6, 7, 3
Dissolved Oxygen (DO) No information located.

Water Salinity 1992 - Salinities average 33-34 ppt during most of the year, with wide variations (8 to 26 ppt) during periods of high precipitation. Methods of sampling not specified.
1
Sedimentation Some eroded material from the adjacent bluffs enters the lagoon as does a limited amount of sediment from the storm drainage system.
1
SOIL

Source
SoilThe floor of the lagoon is underlain to a depth of approximately 40 feet with unconsolidated sand, silts, clays and layers of partially decomposed organic matter.
3
HabitatAcres Vegetation
Open Water30+1995 - green algae and ditch grass predominant.
2
Estuarine emergent wetland (saltmarsh)1.75 1995 - dominated by pickleweed, fleshy jaumea, alkali heath, spearleaved saltbush, and saltgrass.
2
Transitional / palustrineNot specified 1995 - primarily arroyo willow
2
Uplands
1995 - mixed native and non-native, cultivated species, and southern tarplant.
2
ANIMAL USE

Source
Birds1970-1996 - 180 species were identified in various surveys beginning in the 1970's of which 87 are water associated, including 7 species of special status.
3
Fish1970-1995 - five species have been identified from various surveys beginning in the early 1970's, including topsmelt, opaleye, and staghorn sculpin. 1997 - mosquitofish, killifish, and long-jawed mudsucker.
3, 8
Benthic Invertebrates 1970-1995 - 11 species of invertebrates have been identified by various surveys since the early 1970's as occurring in the lagoon. Major taxonomic groups included segmented worms, mollusks (navanax, California brown sea hare,
3

white bubble snail, Calfirornia horn snail, bubble-shell snail, common little neck clam, bent-nose clam and the bay mussel*), and arthropods (skeleton shrimp, mud crabs and the rock crab*).

Insect1995 - monarch butterfly, and wandering (saltmarsh) skipper+, sampling regime not specified.
3
Other Wildlife 1995 - various surveys in the past 20 years have identified three species of amphibians, nine species of reptiles and 15 species of mammals, including the red fox.
3
Special Status Species 1970-1996 - seven species of birds have been identified from various surveys; California brown pelican, American white pelican, double-crested cormorant, western snowy plover, California gull, California least tern, and the tricolored blackbird.
3
OUTLOOK

Source
Enhancement Status An enhancement program was completed in 1996: the northwestern shore of the lagoon, adjacent to the University Center and the South Access Road, was recontoured creating two small islands, soil was amended, and native wetland and scrub vegetation planted. Additionally, riparian habitat along a drainage swale on the eastern edge and a wetland sediment basin at the western edge were created. Studies on providing additional filtered discharge seawater to the lagoon in order to maintain a more consistent water level and quality, are currently (1997) underway. UCSB Habitat Restoration Club, advised by the UCSB Museum of Systematics and Ecology, is implementing several ecological restoration projects on the slopes around the lagoon.
3, 6, 9
Watershed Management The university has instituted Best Managment Practices for the storm drainage system in an effort to reduce the amount of nutrients and contaminants entering the lagoon.
3, 6
PressureThe area around the lagoon is subject to high public use which may disrupt the wildlife, and the continued presence of non-native flora and fauna are detrimental to the native biotic community.
2
SOURCES


1Mackay, K. 1992. A management plan for the campus lagoon and vicinity, University of California, Santa Barbara, a supplement to the UCSB Landscape Master Plan Part III: Natural Areas. 159 pp. and appendices. This study was prepared as one of the wetland management studies called for in the University's certified Long Range Development Plan. Objectives of the report were to describe the status of the natural areas, evaluate their ecological and use-oriented values, and recommend planning options for the 57 acres around and including Campus Lagoon. The documentation of existing conditions includes descriptions of the current and historic physiographic setting, the hydrology, the history of land use, and the biota. Vegetative communities were mapped using aerial photography and ground-truthing; brief descriptions of plankton, invertebrates and birds occurring in sub-habitats are derived from previous studies. Appendices contain cumulative lists of numerous vertebrate surveys carried out between 1966 and 1975, a partial list of flora around the lagoon and vicinity, and the list of plant species included in the University's 1962-63 planting program.

2Ferren, W. R., and K. A. Thomas. 1995. University of California, Santa Barbara natural areas plan: classification, inventory, and management guidelines. UCSB Museum of Systematics and Ecology Environmental Report No. 2. 381 pp. This plan assesses the physical, biological and cultural resources of the natural areas in 3 of the 4 campuses at UC Santa Barbara, identifies management opportunities, and provides implementation guidelines. The current and historic environmental setting are described along with a history of land use and habitat types, which includes aerial photographs and maps. The description of existing conditions uses a detailed classification of vegetative associations based on 1:200 aerial photos and ground-truthing. It also incorporates data from previous studies to describe the terrain, soils, hydrology, historic alterations to the landscape, botanical, and zoological attributes of 16 sites. Functional values and impacts of past and ongoing uses are evaluated and specific management and enhancement actions are recommended for each of these areas. Appendices include a bibliography of documents relating to the landscape of UCSB, and a catalogue of area plants.

3Jones & Stokes Associates, Inc. 1996. Draft management plan for the Campus Lagoon at the University of California, Santa Barbara. 75 pp. The plan outlines the geology, soils, coastal processes, hydrology, water quality, plants and animals, cultural resources, and current uses of the Campus Lagoon and environs, and identifies specific management and enhancement activities that balance the needs of access and education with stewardship of the area's natural resources. The description of existing conditions is based entirely on previous studies. Management actions address erosion, hydrology, water quality, vegetation and habitat enhancement, public access, cultural resources and aesthetic resources. Appendices contain lists of vascular plants and wildlife known to occur in the lagoon area.

4The Planning Center. 1984. Final Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Assessment, Santa Barbara Municipal Airport Master Plan - 1990. 248 pp. Appendices bound seperately. This report evaluates the potential impacts associated with airport improvements planned through 1988, and recommends measures for mitigation. Factors assessed are: hydrology and flood control, biological resources, archaelogical and historical resources, traffic and circulation, land use, noise, air quality, soils and geology, energy facilities, and public services. Information on biological and physical resources is derived primarily from a literature search. A detailed map and description of wetland habitats was developed from an aerial photo and limited field verification. The complete biological and geotechnical reports are contained in the seperately bound appendices which were not viewed.

5Sedway Cooke Associates and Richard Morehouse Associates. 1990. University of California, Santa Barbara 1990 Long Range Development Plan. Prepared for the University of California, Santa Barbara, Office of Budget and Planning. 222 pp. The plan was developed to guide physical development on the Campus through academic year 2005/06, in fulfillment of both University policy and certain provisions of the California Coastal Act. It sets forth the Campus' land use and development proposals for buildings, roads, parking, open space, and natural resource preservation on Main, Storke and West campuses. The plan is an amendment of the Long Range Development Plan approved in 1980. Descriptions of natural resources are general and made within the context of the earlier plan and associated FEIR.

6California Regional Water Quality Control Board, Central Region. 1994. Water quality control plan, Central Coast Region. 200 pp., plus appendices. The plan designates beneficial uses and associated water quality objectives for inland surface waters, enclosed bays and estuaries, and ground waters, for the Central Coast (Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, Monterey, San Benito, Santa Cruz, and portions of San Mateo, Kern and Ventura Counties). It includes a discussion of applicable policies and statutory requirements and identifies measures for achieving water quality objectives. It also describes ongoing monitoring and assessment programs. Appendices contain 35 documents, including the text of state and local policies relevant to implementation of the plan, descriptions of ground water basins and sub-areas, and analyses used to develop various discharge and disposal requirements.

7Central Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board. 1996. 303(d) list of impaired water bodies. 6 pp. A list of waterbodies in the Central Coast Region that do not or are not expected to attain water quality standards after application of required technology-based controls. The list includes the size of the water body, the sampled pollutants affecting designated beneficial uses, the source of the pollutant, and the water body's priority status with regard to developing Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs). The TMDL is the total amount of a pollutant that can be discharged into a water body without compromising water quality standards. 303(d) lists are prepared as part of the Water Quality Assessment of the State's major waterbodies, and meet a requirement of section 303(d) of the federal Clean Water Act.

8Lafferty, K. D.; Marine Science Institute, UC Santa Barbara. April 1997. Personal communication.

9Pritchett, D. A.; US Fish and Wildlife Service, Ventura Office. March 1997. Personal Communication.


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